Follow CAP on Social Media

Listen to the CAP Podcast

Cornelia Tremann: U.S. Secretary of State’s Upcoming African Visit Reveals a Strategy Fixated on Hobbling Chinese Momentum

United States Secretary of State Mike Pompeo will make his first trip to sub-Saharan Africa from February 15th to the 19th when he'll visit Senegal, Angola, and Ethiopia. In a briefing earlier this week ...

In Praising New U.S. Military Deployment Senator Says China and Terrorism Are Growing Security Threats in Africa 

Conservative Oklahoma Senator Jim Inhofe (R) was among the first to praise the Pentagon's decision to deploy the SFAB to Africa, something he said he's been calling for several years now. And, just as the Pentagon did in its statement, Senator Inhofe also singled out China in ...

Competing With China Cited as a Key Reason for New U.S. Army Deployment to Africa

The Pentagon made it very clear on Wednesday that countering Chinese influence in Africa was a key factor behind the decision to deploy the Army’s 1st Security Force Assistance Brigade (SFAB) from Fort Benning, Georgia to work various African militaries. In fact, ...

Effects of Chinese Economic Slowdown Now Starting to Hit African Countries in Ways Both Large and Small

Commodity exporting countries in Asia and Africa are facing potentially serious economic consequences due to the sharp drop in Chinese industrial production and the subsequent reduction in commodity purchases, warned Moody's Investors Services.

China: Between Opening up Its Financial Sector and Holding on to Its Key Economic Sectors

Until recently, foreign companies had been restricted from autonomously and freely operating in the Chinese market due to the strict requirement by China’s government for full Chinese ownership and leadership in the country’s key economic sectors: telecommunications, railways, finance, aerospace among others. For foreign companies that operate ...

Analysis from Cobus van Staden

Cobalt Clarifies Everything

We’re at one of those moments when everyone suddenly remembers that Africa exists. Right through the pandemic, the debt crisis, and climate talks, the continent and its needs were seemingly invisible.

But nothing sharpens the eye like an upcoming FOCAC summit. U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken’s African visit was marked by determination to avoid the Trump administration’s almost Freudian compulsion to blurt out ‘China!’ when talking about African issues. Instead, Blinken ...