Follow CAP on Social Media

Listen to the CAP Podcast

Q&A: What’s At Stake For China in Sudan?

A Sudanese demonstrator raises a picture bearing a crossed out face of Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok, during a rally in front the presidential palace in the capital Khartoum, demanding a return to military rule. AFP

China’s reaction, so far, to Monday’s military coup in Sudan has been reserved, especially compared to the forceful response Beijing issued within 24 hours of last month’s overthrow of President Alpha Condé’s government in Guinea. But China’s interests in Guinea and Sudan are very different and that might explain why Beijing is reluctant to issue the same kind of denunciation of the military that it did of the Conakry coup. Unlike Guinea, which is an important bauxite supplier, Sudan is no longer a key source of oil or other strategic resources for the Chinese.

Today, the challenge for China in Sudan is largely political.

This marketing content will be shown in place of your protected content to anyone who is not allowed to read the post…

  • Get a daily email packed with the latest China-Africa news and analysis.
  • Read exclusive insights on the key trends shaping China-Africa relations.
  • Full access to the News Feed that provides daily updates on Chinese engagement in Africa and throughout the Global South.

China, Africa and the Global South... find out what’s happening.

Subscribe today for unlimited access.

What is The China-Africa Project?

Independent

The CAP is passionately independent, non-partisan and does not advocate for any country, company or culture.

News

A carefully curated selection of the day’s most important China-Africa stories. Updated 24 hours a day by human editors. No bots, no algorithms.

Analysis

Diverse, often unconventional insights from scholars, analysts, journalist and a variety of stakeholders in the China-Africa discourse.

Networking

A unique professional network of China-Africa scholars, analysts, journalists and other practioners from around the world.