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South African Eli Zaelo Wants to be China’s Next “Mandopop” Star

27-year old Pretoria-native Eli Zaelo came to Hong Kong a few years ago to perform as part of the Lion King cast at Disneyland. She had never been to Asia before and didn't speak a word of Chinese, either Cantonese or Mandarin. But she did see an opportunity, ...

South African Singer Eli Zaelo Wants to Become Hong Kong’s Next C-Pop Star

Pretoria native Eli Zaelo first moved to Hong Kong in 2015 to join the cast of the Disney show the "Lion King" which performed in the territory. After the show was over and she returned to South Africa, Zaelo felt compelled to return to the southern Chinese ...

“I Can Be 100% Congolese and 100% Chinese” Social Media Star Zhong Feifei Tells Teen Vogue

Chinese-Congolese social media influencer, model, and aspiring pop star Zhong Feifei got a break this week when the hugely popular publication Teen Vogue profiled her and featured a Q&A: TV: You have a mixed ancestry of both Chinese and Congolese, what was ...

With 62 Million Subscribers in Africa, Chinese-owned Music Streaming Giant Boomplay Now Wants to Go to Europe

Boomplay is the unrivaled champion of Africa's streaming music market with more than 62 million subscribers across the continent.  The Nigeria-based, Chinese-owned company utterly crushes the competition, especially global market leader Spotify that is only available in just five African countries. 

With 53 Million Users, Chinese-owned Boomplay Now Turns to Francophone Africa to Drive Growth

The Chinese-owned streaming music joint venture (Transsion Holdings & Netease) currently dominating the African market is now looking to grow its base of 53 million users by expanding beyond its base in anglophone West Africa into francophone countries. Boomplay's Big Plans

Analysis from Cobus van Staden

Reading the Smoke

As things slowly settle down in South Africa after the last ruinous week, the debates about who’s really to blame are catching fire. It’s now being called an insurrection attempt, and President Ramaphosa has referred to those responsible for fueling the protests as ‘enemies of democracy.’ One of the problems underlying the current crisis is that he’s both right and wrong. South Africa is indeed, as Ramaphosa called it, a ‘hard-fought-for democracy.’ ...